Fact Sheet
June 2018

Short-Term Plans Do Not Cover Life-Saving Mental Health and Substance Use Treatment

Families USA, Mental Health America, the National Alliance on Mental Illness, and the National Council for Behavioral Health are four nonprofit, nonpartisan organizations that represent health care consumers, including those with mental health and substance use disorders. We have joined together to bring attention to a heath care proposal put forth by the Trump administration that would expand short-term health insurance plans. 

Fact Sheet
May 2018

Three Reasons Your Premiums Could Skyrocket This Year

Earlier this week, Maryland and Virginia insurers filed proposed individual market premiums for 2019. Over the coming weeks and months, insurers in the other 48 states and DC will announce proposed premiums. In Maryland and Virginia, many insurers are asking for incredibly large premium increases. In Maryland, average requested rate increases are 30 percent over 2018. In Virginia, proposed premiums are rising more than 15 percent.

Fact Sheet
April 2018

Medicaid Must Play a Central Role in Combating Substance Use Disorder

As the largest single source of health insurance and coverage for behavioral health services in the country, Medicaid plays a pivotal role in addressing substance use disorder (SUD). Medicaid covers nearly 4 in 10 non-elderly adults in the country with opioid addiction. But this coverage could go further: at least 17 percent of opioid addicts are uninsured, a rate nearly 50 percent higher than the general population. 

Fact Sheet
June 2018

Restrictive Medicaid 1115 Waivers: Status in the States

An increasing number of states are making harmful changes to their Medicaid programs using “Section 1115 waivers.” Families USA is tracking state Medicaid waivers that restrict access to quality, affordable health care for low-income families and adults. This new grid offers an overview of the status of each state’s waiver proposal, the restrictive elements of the waiver proposal, and CMS’s decision on each element. 

Fact Sheet
April 2018

Trump Administration 'Public Charge' Rule Threatens Health Care for Immigrant Families, Including U.S. Citizen Children

The impact of a proposed Trump administration rule extends well beyond the directly targeted individuals and families whose health will be at risk. A community’s overall health depends on the health of all of its members. The impact of this proposed rule will spill over to others in many ways. Without insurance, families may delay care or forego it altogether. This means there will be more children in school, and adults in the workplace, without needed preventive services and untreated illnesses. More people delaying care until the last possible moment will strain emergency resources. Hospitals’ and clinics’ uncompensated care burdens will increase. 

Fact Sheet
March 2018

How Medicaid Waivers Could Limit Access to Oral Health Care

States can propose changes to their Medicaid programs using  1115 waivers that require approval from the federal government. Recently, many states are using these waivers to erect barriers to their residents getting the coverage and care they need—including oral health coverage and care. 
 
Instead of using the waivers to pursue positive innovations, many of these waivers would reduce oral health access. Luckily, oral health advocates can play an important role in promoting good waivers and stopping harmful ones. Use this factsheet to learn more about how certain waiver elements effect oral health access and talking points that advocates can use to raise these issues with policy makers.
Fact Sheet
March 2018

Funding CSR Payments in the Health Insurance Stabilization Package Could Harm Low- and Middle-Income Consumers

Families USA strongly supports bipartisan efforts to give consumers affordable health insurance in the individual market. A successful stabilization bill would enhance affordability and access by raising advance premium tax credits (APTCs), funding reinsurance, financing outreach and enrollment assistance, and stopping proposed regulations that would let short-term plans and association health plans (AHPs) substantially undermine the individual market.

Fact Sheet
March 2018

Work Requirements in Medicaid Waivers: These Aren’t About Work

CMS has approved work requirements (sometimes spun as “community engagement” requirements) in three states: Arkansas, Kentucky, and Indiana. Eight additional states have similar requests pending, and CMS appears likely to approve those requests, as well. Litigation challenging the authority of the executive branch to approve work requirements—rules that are contained nowhere in Medicaid law—have also begun.

View our 50-state map to see Medicaid waiver activity in the states.

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